July 2013

by Raegen Pietrucha

“Cost-per-seat MPS.” Say those words aloud. Perhaps you’ve never heard them together before; I myself was only introduced to the concept last year, having caught Greg Walters’ mention of it during a panel discussion at CompTIA’s Breakaway event.

by Christopher DiReda, OKI Data

The task of managing a business is not easy by any means. But for hard-copy channel partners, this task is further compounded by a tumultuous economic situation in the industry — including margin and revenue declines, a struggling global economy and the proliferation of mobile device usage replacing hard-copy output.

by Darrell Amy, Dealer Marketing

Managed services is no longer a new concept to our industry. Dealers have invested tremendous amounts of time and money in managed services software, staff and training. Yet when you look at most dealerships, you’ll find that the percentage of their customers engaged in managed services agreements is still relatively small.

by Dave Westlake, PrintCommand

Enterprises face staggering — and escalating — vulnerabilities. A 2013 study of the Global 2000 companies by Ponemon Institute projects an average loss of $450 million per U.S. organization due to network attacks. Globally, that’s $398 million.

  • By Markus Brinsa
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  • It’s a common scenario: You receive a service call claiming that a printer is down. Your dispatcher sends a field technician to the customer. The tech fixes the issue, closes the ticket and prepares for the next call.
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  • You wish.
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By Markus Brinsa

It’s a common scenario: You receive a service call claiming that a printer is down. Your dispatcher sends a field technician to the customer. The tech fixes the issue, closes the ticket and prepares for the next call.

You wish.

 

  • By Robert Palmer

Not that long ago, businesses operated in what could best be described as a centralized office environment. Information was basically collected, created and assimilated at the very top levels of the company and flowed down through the organization. In terms of documents and printing, it was very much a “print and distribute” model. Information was printed in hard-copy form, then distributed to recipients who had little means to interact with or work with that information, except to go back to the top and start the process all over again.

By Robert Palmer

Not that long ago, businesses operated in what could best be described as a centralized office environment. Information was basically collected, created and assimilated at the very top levels of the company and flowed down through the organization. In terms of documents and printing, it was very much a “print and distribute” model. Information was printed in hard-copy form, then distributed to recipients who had little means to interact with or work with that information, except to go back to the top and start the process all over again.