Blogs

PA 2018 120by Patricia Ames

Lexmark unveiled a slew of new equipment at their recent dealer event in Ft. Lauderdale , FL and showcased an impressive array of workflow solutions from their Kofax and Readsoft brands. If you’d like to read more about solutions, Senior Analyst Amy Weiss does an excellent job of covering Lexmark’s flagship TotalAgility refresh in Workflow here, and if you haven’t read my interview with former Kofax CEO and current VP of Lexmark International and President of Lexmark Enterprise Software Reynolds Bish, take a look – he’s at the forefront of their digital transformation efforts.

John McIntyresqby John McIntyre

In HP’s recent Q2 earnings conference call, President and CEO Dion Weisler commented on “the work we are doing around marketing to stimulate printing demand. We are shifting our marketing efforts from marketing printers to marketing printing.”

Amy 2018 120by Amy Weiss

Here’s a fact: You’re not going to attend a dealer meeting and hear doom and gloom, negative stories and “we are not launching any new products this year.” Dealer meetings are, by nature, positive, exciting, and full of new ideas and product launches that will pump up the dealers and create enthusiasm over the year to come.

John McIntyresqby John McIntyre

If you have spent any time reviewing the latest quarterly and/or annual financial reports from almost all the major OEMs in the printer/copier industry, you can’t help but be affected by the overall downbeat performance shown by these companies – and their less than enthusiastic comments about what the future may hold for their firms.

John McIntyresqby John McIntyre

The imaging and printing industry is undergoing a period of profound transition, a transition driven by seemingly irreversible technological shifts in the principal business model which has served the industry for half a century. Among many, the changes include:

John McIntyresqby John McIntyre

Rumors suggesting that Lexmark was being pursued by Apex Technology Co., the same company that bought Lexmark archenemy Static Control last year, have percolated since April 7 from numerous sources. The reports were discounted by many in the printing/imaging industry because the move was seen as an odd fit – a major printer hardware OEM being acquired by a company known principally for producing components for aftermarket ink and toner makers. At the same time there were also reports that Lenovo expressed interest in acquiring Lexmark, a move that would reunite two substantial ex-IBM divisions under Chinese ownership.

John McIntyresqby John McIntyre

The on-again, off-again union of financially ailing Sharp Electronics of Japan and Taiwan-based contract manufacturing giant Foxconn was finally agreed to on March 30, months after an initial agreement was reached in principle. Inking the final deal came after weeks of wrangling over details of the actual fiscal standing of Sharp – which revealed a company far worse off than originally presented — and thus, how much Foxconn was willing to pay.

John McIntyreby John McIntyre | 3/25/16

In Part 1 of this series we looked at HP’s rationale for rebranding its page-wide devices, and in Part 2 we took a deep dive into those new releases. But while the floodlights and the red carpet were being rolled out for the PageWide coming out party, HP also released a number of new Officejet and LaserJet models, brands that have been essential “meat and potatoes” products in HP’s line for decades. Before we take a look at the new models, here is an update to HP’s positioning and messaging for these two major business printer lines:

John McIntyreby John McIntyre | 3/21/16

In Part 1 of this series we looked at HP’s rationale for rebranding its page-wide devices. Rebranding movement aside, however, the spring launch event was all about new HP printing products – PageWide, OfficeJets, and, LaserJets too. Under the broad banner of “Printing Reinvented,” the firm introduced:

John McIntyreby John McIntyre | 3/21/16

In the high tech biz, we have become accustomed to observing a new product technology capability debut and swiftly create a tsunami of disruptive change, often resulting in the upending of a long dominant and established product category. The elements in driving this market transformation are often easy to discern; benefits over the more mature technology such as speed, price or operating costs, functionality, usability and durability, among others. In most categories, the advent of a new offering with significant benefits makes choosing the new entry an easy and apparent decision; a “no-brainer” in everyday vernacular.