Blogs

John McIntyreby John McIntyre   

Well, the headline is a teaser for something you surely already know - Fujifilm acquired print and copy icon Xerox, and then will merge it with longtime Xerox engine and manufacturing partner Fuji Xerox, creating the largest player in the print/imaging industry with annual combined revenues of $18 billion. In a prepared statement, the firm explained that Fujifilm will own 50.1 percent of the combined company, and made the case for the integration of the two operations:

Amy 2018 120by Amy Weiss   

Sounds impressive, but is it really?

The January 31 announcement from Xerox and Fujifilm that they were entering an agreement to combine Xerox with Fuji Xerox was not entirely surprising, considering that rumors had been circulating for most of the month of January, since the Wall Street Journal reported earlier in the month that the two companies were in talks.

PA 2018 120by Patricia Ames   

James Bond would not be pleased. Last week, reports confirmed rumors that vulnerabilities in processors manufactured by Intel, AMD and ARM indeed existed. Somehow, the vulnerability has gone undiscovered for over two decades (at least officially), and affects chips manufactured since as early as 1995. Even more surprisingly, researchers from four different organizations spread out across the globe — Graz’s University of Technology, Cyberus Technology, Google’s Project Zero and Paul Kocher — each reported to Intel that they had discovered the bug within a month of each other. Since the news broke, Apple, Microsoft, Google, and other tech giants have released patches, but some experts are skeptical as to whether they will be effective or not.  

Amy 2018 120by Amy Weiss

At Sharp’s National Dealer Meeting in Phoenix last week there were a couple of recurring themes. One, which will come as no surprise, was Foxconn, and its infusion of cash into the formerly troubled Sharp. The other was water. That, on the surface, is a little bit odder, but we’ll get into it shortly. The two-plus day event hosted more than 900 attendees including 605 dealer participants — a 5.2 percent increase over the previous event and just the beginning of some improved numbers we saw from Sharp.

PA 2018 120by Patricia Ames

We are a year removed from HP’s announcement of Smart Device Services (SDS). The technology combines device-embedded sensors and cloud-based tools to optimize the way you monitor, manage and diagnose service needs across your entire fleet of HP devices. In its first iteration, SDS offered automated supplies management, on-demand training for techs in the field, and remote remediation tools. It also enabled service providers to diagnose problems remotely before dispatching a tech and locate missing devices to ensure accurate billing.

PA 2018 120by Patricia Ames  

In September, I was honored to host an OEM panel at the Select Dealer Group meeting in Chicago. I was joined by Kevin Kern, senior vice president, Business Intelligence Services and Product Planning at Konica Minolta; Mimi Evenson, national channel manager, MPS and solutions specialist and IPG technical consultant at HP Inc.; Jim Morrissey, vice president of Sales Document Technology Partners at Xerox; and Jim Coriddi, vice president, Dealer Division at Ricoh. For nearly two hours, we covered a lot of ground, from growth and strategy to mobility and security. But just because only a few got to see the event live doesn’t mean you shouldn’t get to hear about it, too. So allow me to share some highlights of my panel at the SDG meeting.    

PA 2018 120by Patricia Ames

PRINT 17 was held from September 10-14 in Chicago, and I had the pleasure of attending. It was impressive. The biannual show and mirror to Graph Expo was a who’s who of the graphic communications industry. All of the major players packed McCormick Place’s South Hall to show off their latest and greatest technology — and to make some announcements, too — while exhibition-goers were welcome to sit in on a number of educational seminars, hands-on labs, and panel discussions. I thought I’d share an abridged version of “my” PRINT 17.

John McIntyresqby John McIntyre

Printer and PC giant HP Inc. reported its Q3 financials August 23 and there was mostly good news to announce. Our reading of the tea leaves indicates that PCs are gaining ground and printers are largely holding their own, although it is a little more complex than that.      

John McIntyresqby John McIntyre

In Part 1 of this article we looked at the financial performance of the “new” Xerox following its Q2 financial results, which marked the second quarterly financial report since the company split itself in two on Jan. 1. The company explains it expects to see overall revenue improvement build toward the end of Q3, noting that it laid out a strategy at its most recent investor conference to weight its revenues over time to the growth areas of the market. But growing share in the channel is easier said than done. 

John McIntyresqby John McIntyre

On Aug. 1, the “new” Xerox (which looks a lot like the “old’ Xerox) announced its Q2 financial results, marking the second quarterly financial report since the company split itself in two on Jan. 1, spinning off its business process outsourcing operations into Conduent and reforming Xerox as a document print/copy and managed imaging services company.